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From the Library of Richard Holland
Connecting
Top Managers
Developing Executive Teams
for Business Success
JIM TAYLOR
LISA HANEBERG
From the Library of Richard Holland
Vice President, Publisher: Tim Moore
Associate Publisher and Director of Marketing: Amy Neidlinger
Executive Editor: Jeanne Glasser
Editorial Assistant: Pamela Boland
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© 2011 by MPI Consulting
Publishing as FT Press
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All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, in any form or by any means,
without permission in writing from the publisher.
Printed in the United States of America
First Printing December 2010
Pearson Education LTD.
Pearson Education Australia PTY, Limited.
Pearson Education Singapore, Pte. Ltd.
Pearson Education Asia, Ltd.
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Pearson Educación de Mexico, S.A. de C.V.
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Pearson Education Malaysia, Pte. Ltd.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data:
Taylor, Jim, 1949Connecting top managers : developing executive teams for business success / Jim Taylor, Lisa
Haneberg. — 1st ed.
p. cm
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-13-707156-2 (hardback : alk. paper) 1. Leadership. 2. Business ethics. 3.
Teams in the workplace. 4. Success in business. I. Haneberg, Lisa. II. Title.
HD57.7.T385 2011
658.4’022–dc22
2010045726
ISBN-10: 0-13-707156-6
ISBN-13: 978-0-13-707156-2
From the Library of Richard Holland
Contents
Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Introduction A Pack of Top Dogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Who This Book Is For. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Who We Are . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
How the Book Is Organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Time Is Precious . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Chapter 1
Executive Team Execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Definitions of Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Measures of Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Section 1: Business Results. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Financial Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Customer Retention and Satisfaction . . . . . . . . 21
Strategic Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Section 2: Daily Team Effectiveness . . . . . . . . . 23
Decision-making Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Relationship Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
The Team’s Reputation Within the
Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Section 3: Talent Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Bench Strength and Succession Planning . . . . . 30
Management Team Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Leadership Team Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Section 4: The Workplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Organizational Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Employee Engagement and Retention . . . . . . . 35
Organizational Agility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Which Indicators Should You Measure? . . . . . . 38
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
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Chapter 2
CONNECTING TOP MANAGERS
The Clash of Titans: Executive
Teaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
What Is Executive Teaming? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Dysfunction Reverberates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Holding Yourself to a High Standard . . . . . . . . . 43
Two Executive Teaming Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Ensure Differences Don’t Lead to Clashes . . . 46
Practice Partnership at All Times . . . . . . . . . . . 51
The Traits of Leadership Team Partnership . . . 53
Shared Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Shared Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Mutual Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Critical Thinking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Shared Success and Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Effective Inclusion and Communication . . . . . 55
Partnership Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Don’t Try to Control Peers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Spend Time Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Resolve Relationship Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Represent Each Other Well . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Never Bad Mouth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Own Problems and Challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Be Humble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Know Their Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Working on Your Teaming Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Chapter 3
Meetings Are Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
The Cost of Meetings Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Value of Meetings Hurdle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Why Are You Meeting?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
From the Library of Richard Holland
CONTENTS
Chapter 4
v
Culture Is the Context and Often
the Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
What Is an Organization’s Culture? . . . . . . . . . . 85
How Are Organizational Cultures Formed
and Changed? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Improving the Organization’s Culture . . . . . . . . 91
Define the Desired Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Define the Current Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Assess Capacity for Change (C4C) . . . . . . . . . 106
Create Plan for Cultural Improvement . . . . . . 108
Be the Culture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Chapter 5
They Are All Moments of Truth . . . . . . . 119
Be Fast or Fail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Successful Moments of Truth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
How to Quickly Make a Positive Impact
and Build Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Credibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Familiarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Connection to You and the Team . . . . . . . . . . 131
Connection to the Organization . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Interest, Passion, and Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . 132
Clarity, Commitment, and Focus . . . . . . . . . . 132
Make a Splash! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
All for One, One for All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Chapter 6
Getting Better Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Leadership Team Member Capabilities. . . . . . 142
More Than Competencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Intra-Team Talent Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Peer Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
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CONNECTING TOP MANAGERS
Team Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Team Development Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Chapter 7
Creating an Agile Organization . . . . . . . 161
A Primer on Organizational Agility . . . . . . . . . 162
What Is Organizational Agility? . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Model of Organizational Agility . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Five Benefits of Organizational Agility . . . . . . 168
Organizational Agility: Two Scenarios . . . . . . . 170
Assessment: How Agile Is Your
Organization? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Individual and Leadership Team Agility . . . . . 180
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Chapter 8
Leadership Team Strategies for
Remaining Union-Free . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
10 Early Warning Signs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
10 Reasons Employees Organize . . . . . . . . . . . 194
12 Issues Targeted by Unions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
12 Reasons for Union-Organizing Success. . . . 199
Be Visible and Known and Build
Relationships at All Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Measure and Improve Your Organization’s
Connectivity Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Ensure Role Clarity for Management
Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Shore Up Management Fundamentals
from Top to Bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
From the Library of Richard Holland
CONTENTS
Conclusion
vii
A Manifesto About Love and
Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Will You Go for the Gold? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Executive Team Execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
The Clash of Titans: Executive Teaming . . . . . 221
Meetings Are Money. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Culture Is the Context and Often the Answer . 223
They Are All Moments of Truth . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Getting Better Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Creating an Agile Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Leadership Team Strategies for
Remaining Union-Free. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Appendix
The Leadership Team Excellence
Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
The Leadership Team Survey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Part 1: How We Measure Success . . . . . . . . . . 232
Part 2: How We Spend Time Together . . . . . . 233
Part 3: How We Impact Organizational
Excellence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
The Leadership Team Survey with
Discussion Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Part 1: How We Measure Success . . . . . . . . . . 237
Part 2: How We Spend Time Together . . . . . . 238
Part 3: How We Impact Organizational
Excellence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
The Leadership Team Survey as a Tool
for Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
From the Library of Richard Holland
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From the Library of Richard Holland
Foreword
I recently had the honor of being inducted into the Pro Football
Hall of Fame and spent some time reflecting on my 52-year career as
a player and coach. I thought about the successes of which I was most
proud, the failures that still sting, and the lessons I have learned
about teams and participating in the process of leading.
One lesson is that it’s all about the team. The ultimate team sport
is football. Everyone must work together and accept his role for the
group to succeed. Everyone is needed; no one is essential. All must
function as a unit to allow the desired victorious results.
The most skilled and talented team often does not win. And we
have seen underdog teams rise to glory fueled seemingly on a collective will, love, or something else more powerful. Why does this happen? It happens because effort and execution—our physical
game—is deeply linked to and supported by our mental game, or how
we are feeling about our team and our mission. The power of a unified group is a very real and tangible thing.
Great teams are connected to one another; each person is
invested in the success of the other, as each one embraces their particular roles in the process of team building. All roles, even those in
waiting, are critical. I can remember seasons when my team had a
special quality and was a very strong unit of performance; watching
them work together was the ultimate pleasure of coaching. I have also
seen extremely talented teams underperform together because the
spirit of unity was missing.
One of the most important lessons I have learned is that the
power of great teams is not limited to the playing field and that the
relationships are at the core of every team. The same dynamic has
played out in my work as a player, coach, leader, friend, and father.
Great relationships fuel results. Connection, cohesion, respect, and
collaboration are some of the most important qualities of any team,
whether they are of athletic or business orientation.
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CONNECTING TOP MANAGERS
Lisa Haneberg and my friend Jim Taylor have done an outstanding job capturing the essential lessons of great leadership teamwork
in this book. Their assertions that executives ought to be great team
members are right on, and their methods and suggestions will help
any leadership team improve their results.
Over the years, I have learned about the importance of the depth,
strength, and openness of professional relationships. The best teams
tap into their individual and collective talents to steer their performance for optimal results. It may seem mystical or esoteric, but it’s not.
Relationships are built through deliberate actions and intentions.
This book will inspire your intentions and show you how to proactively build a stronger executive team. On the field and in the
boardroom, who we are as leadership team members is a key factor in
the formula for success.
—Dick LeBeau, NFL Hall of Fame 2010
From the Library of Richard Holland
Acknowledgments
We would like to thank our clients for providing the rich and
helpful examples that we have presented throughout this book. While
we have not named you here, you will know the story is yours, and we
thank you for being a part of the book and learning experience. We
would also like to thank our colleagues who offered their stories and
blog posts, including Connie Kocher, Terry Starbucker, Wally Bock,
and Dwayne Melancon. We would like to thank our agent Jeffrey
Krames for being a great source of wisdom and ideas for how to shape
this book and our editor at the FT Press, Jeanne Glasser, for believing
in this work and for being such a joy to work with. We would also like
to thank the teams that participated in our senior leadership team
survey and focus group participants. And last but not least, we would
like to thank our staff at MPI Consulting, especially Angie King and
Nancy Sies, who helped us pull this book together.
From Jim:
I would like to thank Dick LeBeau for his friendship and inspiration. I value the closeness of our families, the role model you served
with inspiring my two sons, your leadership skills, and your positive
influence on so many leaders and players in the NFL. You deserve to
be a member of the Hall of Fame (inducted in 2010).
I would also like to thank the thousands of senior leaders from
California to Texas to Florida to Connecticut to Ohio who I have had
had the opportunity to meet, get to know, and learn about their
organizations in so many diverse industries, from health care to manufacturing to coal mines to food processing to telecommunications. I
am thankful to have had the opportunity to consult with Fortune 100
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CONNECTING TOP MANAGERS
companies, medium and small heart-run organizations, and many
family-owned companies.
As a small town boy who came from a town of just 900 people and
very humble roots, I am thankful everyday to have the privilege of
leading an innovative, well-respected, boutique management consulting firm. I admire this company and the work we do. This book is
really a culmination of decades of doing what I know and love.
And I would like to especially thank my wife, Myrna, and my sons,
Ryan and Neil, for their support of me and my work.
From Lisa:
Like Jim, I am thankful to have had the opportunity to get to
know and learn from some of the most talented leaders. And while
there are too many to mention every one, I would like to acknowledge
several leaders who inspired content in this book including Jerre
Fuqua, Timo Shaw, Ronald Korenhof, Brenda Gumbs, Neil Winslow,
Ralph Stayer, Mark Riley, Beth Hildreth, Bob Keyes, and Lisa
Edwards.
I would also like to thank fellow thought leaders and bloggers who
keep me on my toes and inspire me including John Kotter, Steve
Farber, Marshall Goldsmith, David Ulrich, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
Tony Schwartz, Bill Strickland, Terry Starbucker, Wally Bock, Dwayne
Melancon, Raj Setty, Dan Pink, Rosa Say, Tanmay Mora, Wayne Turmel,
Phil Gerbyshak, Alexandra Levit, Jodee Bock, Todd Sattersten, and Tom
Peters. Without you, the book would have been much more boring and
unenlightened!
From the Library of Richard Holland
Introduction: A Pack of Top Dogs
Lisa was sitting with the CEO of a food manufacturer discussing the model for their senior leadership team. The CEO
and his vice president of human resources had taken a stab at
creating their model and had emailed it to Lisa the week
before and asked for her input.
“I think what you have here is great, but it is incomplete,”
Lisa said. “You are missing half the model.”
“Really, how so?” asked the CEO with great interest.
Lisa pulled a simple one-page diagram from a folder. “What
you have defined is your expectations for what great functional leadership means to you and at this organization. What
you have not yet addressed are your expectations for how
your team ought to lead together or what senior leadership
team excellence looks like and the impact you expect your
team should have on steering this organization, results, culture, and the strength of the management function.”
The CEO saw the power of the revised model immediately,
and it changed his approach to how he and his team would
lead together, and it expanded his definition of senior leadership team excellence.
This is a true story and one that we have seen played out with many
leaders over the years. These experiences inspired us to write this book
and share with you what we have learned about leadership teams and
how to boost the positive impact they can have on organizations.
Many organizations use incomplete leadership models, which is
not surprising because leaders often tend to focus on their functional
1
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CONNECTING TOP MANAGERS
(or divisional) responsibilities. Most of their time is spent running the
part of the business they have been hired to lead. Their financial
rewards are likely tied to unit success, and the people in their unit are
who they represent at leadership team meetings and during strategic
planning sessions. Recruiting and hiring decisions are often based
primarily on previous results as a group leader, and bigger and
broader job opportunities are often offered to the leaders who have
effectively managed their units.
And so it is not at all surprising to us that the other part of the leadership model, the part that we call leadership team excellence, is often
overlooked. You might be thinking that this makes perfect sense. That
95% of a leader’s time is spent running his or her function or unit, and
therefore we should focus on, measure, and reward leaders based on
what happens there. If departments and divisions don’t perform well,
organizations can’t succeed.
We agree that functional success is critical and that it represents
only half of the picture of excellence. Here are a few things we have
learned that we hope will compel you to keep reading:
• Leadership teams, as a whole, create the culture and set the
tone for how managers and employees work.
• One of the greatest predictors of whether a workforce will seek
union representation and whether a union campaign will succeed is the connection and trust employees have established
with the leadership team.
• Clashing styles within the leadership team have a strong, rippling, and negative effect on the entire organization.
• Although they are the most expensive in the organization in
terms of payroll and opportunity costs, many leadership team
meetings fail to produce satisfactory results.
Throughout this book, we explore these and many other ways that
leaders, as a team, impact organizational success. We share examples,
research, and actionable practices that you and your team members
can use to enhance your results across several measures of excellence.
From the Library of Richard Holland
INTRODUCTION: A PACK OF TOP DOGS
3
We believe in the 5/95 Rule. Five percent of your time—the
approximately 100 hours per year that you spend together as a
team—impacts 95% of the success of several organizational systems.
If you can optimize this 5%, you will see positive returns in many
areas including organizational culture, employee engagement and
retention, productivity and results, and organizational agility. We
have designed and organized this book to help leadership teams make
the most of this precious 5%.
Who This Book Is For
We have written this book for leaders. Leaders are members of at
least two teams—their functional or unit groups and their peer leadership teams. Our focus is on helping leaders and their team colleagues get better together. Members of middle management teams
will also benefit from the recommendations we share, and we invite
human resources, organization development, and training professionals to use this book to develop their leaders and leadership teams
as well.
“The leaders who work most effectively, it seems to me, never
say ‘I.’ And that’s not because they have trained themselves
not to say ‘I.’ They don’t think ‘I.’ They think ‘we’; they think
‘team.’ They understand their job to be to make the team
function. They accept responsibility and don’t sidestep it, but
‘we’ gets the credit…. This is what creates trust, what enables
you to get the task done.”1
—Peter Drucker
Who We Are
Jim Taylor and Lisa Haneberg work together at MPI Consulting,
a boutique management consulting firm headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. Jim is the president and CEO of MPI Consulting and is a
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CONNECTING TOP MANAGERS
leading expert on what organizations can and should do to remain
union-free. He has worked with over 300 leadership teams to help
them build positive employee relations environments and has seen
the impact that great and not-so-great senior teams can have on company culture, union vulnerability, and corporate success. Lisa is vicepresident and leads the firm’s organizational development practice.
She is a nationally known thought leader in the areas of leadership,
middle management, and organizational development. Both Jim and
Lisa were successful leaders inside large organizations before becoming consultants.
How the Book Is Organized
Other than Chapter 1, “Executive Team Execution,” which
describes our model and lists our recommendations regarding how
leadership teams ought to measure their success, the chapters can be
read and used in any order. We have brought together our best thinking and the best practices from organizations and other thought leaders to give you compelling and specific ideas about leadership team
excellence. We have also conducted focus groups and targeted surveys to augment and add color to the information.
Time Is Precious
We have designed this book to help leadership teams make the
most of their time together. Rest assured that we do not suggest massive systems that take too many of your 100 hours together. We have
selected best practices that make good use of that precious time.
We believe, and our work and research supports, that how leaders
work together is as important as how well they lead their individual
departments. The executives we have worked with over the last 36
years have been strong, smart, hardworking professionals promoted
and praised based on their individual leadership and management
capabilities and results. When they come together as a team, they are
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INTRODUCTION: A PACK OF TOP DOGS
5
a pack of top dogs. The skills and practices that got them promoted
may not be the same ones that are needed to be a great leadership
team member.
What if your impact and success depends on how well you and
your fellow leaders work together? We believe that it does and invite
you to dive right into Chapter 1.
“Work can be one of the most joyful, most fulfilling aspects of
life. Whether it will be or not depends on the actions we collectively take.”2
—Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Endnotes
1. Peter Drucker, Managing the Non-Profit Organization: Practices and Principles,
18.
2. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Good Business: Leadership, Flow and the Making of
Meaning, 1.
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Executive Team Execution
“The winning strategy combines analytically sound, ambitious, but logical goals with methods that help people experience new, often very ambitious goals, as exciting, meaningful,
and uplifting—creating a deeply felt determination to move,
make it happen, and win, now.”1
—John Kotter
Like most productivity models and frameworks, our model of
leadership excellence is based on the assumption that results increase
when we improve capabilities, define excellence, and measure success. This may sound simple, but some approaches lack a strong
measurement component because leadership can be hard to quantify.
As we mentioned in the Introduction, our model includes two main
parts that address the needs for functional/unit leadership and leadership team excellence. Figure 1.1 further illustrates that each side has
three parts: Definitions of Success, the Implementation System, and
Measurements of Success.
Our overall model of leadership excellence covers both team and
functional leadership. For the rest of this book, however, we focus on
only the left side of the model, Leadership Team Excellence, as
pictured in Figure 1.2.
7
From the Library of Richard Holland
8
CONNECTING TOP MANAGERS
Leadership Excellence
As Unit Leaders We
Should
As a Team We Should
Definitions of Success
Definitions of Success
(And what success looks like in
action)
(And what success looks like in
action)
The Implementation
System
The Implementation
System
(Systemic elements and practices
that help leaders align actions with
intentions)
(Systemic elements and practices
that help leaders align actions with
intentions)
Measures of Success
Measures of Success
Figure 1.1 Key elements of leadership excellence as applied to individual and team performance
Leadership Team Excellence
As a Team We Should
Definitions of Success
(And what success looks like in action)
The Implementation System
Your
Execution
Engine
(Systemic elements and practices that help
leaders align actions with intentions)
Measures of Success
Figure 1.2 Key elements of leadership team excellence, which together
create an engine for execution
From the Library of Richard Holland
CHAPTER 1 • EXECUTIVE TEAM EXECUTION
9
Each component of the model is important. When used as a foundation for how your leadership team operates, the model drives execution. Here is a brief description of the three sections of the model:
1. Definitions of Success—Included in the Definitions of Success
are 1) descriptions of what great leadership is and the overall
impact leaders ought to have and 2) detailed behavioral examples of what excellence looks like in action. The second part of
the definition is often missing and can be used to calibrate meaning and understanding. This description of success should be
illustrative but not prescriptive. For example, you might set the
expectation that meeting conversations ought to be lively,
focused, and help move the work forward. This description tells
us something about the desired quality of the conversation but
not the specific techniques we should use to create this outcome.
2. The Implementation System—The Implementation System
section of the model seems to be the most misunderstood and
least used component. Ironically, it is also where you can generate the fastest results. The Implementation System is a term
we use for the many systemic tools leaders use to create results
from strategies, such as roles, measures, processes, culture,
rewards, communication methods, analysis, planning, internal
and external benchmarking, and resources allocation. Figure
1.3 shows a sampling of the types of systems that make up your
implementation system.
Each one of these systems in the bottom portion of the chart i

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